The Following is a link to the GDPR Infographic (Data Protection Commissioner)

Key Terms

Personal data: means data relating to a living individual who is (or can be) identified  either from the data itself, or from the data in conjunction with other information  that is in, or is likely to come into, the possession of the data controller.

Data Subject: is an individual who is the subject of personal data.

Data Controller: is an organisation or person who (either alone or with others) controls the contents and use of personal data.

Data means automated and manual data  

Automated data means information that –
(a) is being processed by means of equipment operating automatically in response to instructions given for that
Purpose, or
(b) is recorded with the intention that it should should be processed by means of such equipment;

Manual data means information that is recorded as part of a relevant filing system or with the intention that it should form part of a relevant filing system;

Relevant filing system means any set of information relating to individuals to the extent that, although the information is not processed by means of equipment operating automatically in response to instructions given for that purpose, the set is structured, either by reference to individuals or by reference to criteria relating to individuals, in such a way that specific information relating to a particular individual is readily accessible

Data processor is a person who processes personal data on behalf of a data controller but does not include an employee of a data controller who processes such data in the course of his employment.

Encryption is the process of encoding information stored on a device and can add a further useful layer of security.  It is considered an essential security measure where personal data is stored on a portable device or transmitted over a public network.  As with passwords, this measure is pointless unless the key to decrypt the data is kept secure.

Back Up Systems.  A back up system is an essential means of recovering from the loss or destruction of data. While some system should be in place, the frequency and nature of back up will depend, amongst other factors, on the type of organisation and the nature of data being processed.  The security standards for back-up data are the same as for live data.  Click here for more information on back-up data.

For a comprehensive list please visit the Data Protection Commissioner.